Posts Tagged ‘NHS alternatives’

Blogpost 19 : 26/2/18

April 6, 2018

Letters to Daily Mirror

Posted

30/1/18   Single Market
Jeremy Corbyn wants to pay to stay in the Single Market, to protect jobs.
This would avoid vulnerable businesses facing the EU’s punitive taxes on imports but it would also encourage lazy management of less vulnerable businesses.
It would be cheaper and, in the long run, more productive, to leave The Single Market and have Companies apply for subsidies to pay the EU surcharges, whilst they looked for markets outside The EU.
Hopefully, these subsidies would eventually end, as other Markets opened.

13/2/18  NHS alternatives
Now that Jeremy Hunt is entering the final stages of selling off the NHS, we’re being asked to have an “adult” conversation about financing it.
I’ve come across two alternatives to our Aneurin Bevan model.
The first is a revival of Thatcher’s voucher system, or Personal Health Plan.
Under this we’d each be allocated a fixed lifetime, or yearly, sum, which we could spend on treatment.
Once you’d had your allocation, you’d have to fund further cover yourself.
Tough, if you have no such resources.
The more favoured option is a two tier system, such as they have in the USA and some EU countries, such as France.
Although much of our NHS is being bought by American Health Care companies, it is being touted that we would probably emulate France.
The US system is despised, because those, who can’t afford the cheapest tier of health insurance, can only receive the barest of emergency aid, before being kicked out.
Even those on a reasonable level of health insurance can find themselves being bankrupted, because hospital costs are ridiculously high.
Prices are encouraged to rise, precisely because they are covered by insurance.
The likes of the French system are held up as the preferred model, whereby the State funds 2/3 the costs and voters pay 1/3.
Those who are deemed too poor to pay any contribution have all the cost paid.
I don’t know if there is a cap on this but, more worrying, is who decides the level at which The State picks up the tab.
The present disgraceful benefit assessments by ATOS don’t inspire confidence.
I’m hoping that Labour regains office and is allowed to rescue our NHS but in case it doesn’t, it’d be a help if The Mirror journalists amassed the facts and figures necessary to fight this “adult” conversation.

20/2/18   Brexit?
It is understandable as to why those, who want to remain in the EU, are mounting their campaign to overturn Brexit, as Theresa May’s deadlne closes in.
It is understandable why Soros, Branson and Blair are splashing out money on polls and opinion pieces in Newspapers to protect their Interests.
What is not understandable is why May seems to be calling advance and then taking two steps back at every point of Brexit negotiations.
Despite being told, before the Referendum, that it meant leaving the Single Market and the Customs Union, it seems apparent that we’ll be staying.
The only difference will be that we’ll have no say on how our contributions are wasted.

20/2/18  Oxfam
The debate over the Oxfam abuses has been very strongly fought by both sides.
I can understand the strength of feeling over the abuse, in our name, of the people needing help but I was surprised by the strength of the campaign for Oxfam to continue to be funded out of taxes.
Why do we have to hand over funds to foreign dignitaries and other such third party organisations?
We have armed forces, starved of funds, who could provide aid, first hand.
My preference is for us to use these trained and fully equipped personnel, who know how to behave?

22/2/18  Gun Law
The Americans have always gone for firepower over strategy, which is why so many innocent people have died in the Middle East and why they haven’t won any major armed conflicts since WWII (Haiti, Panama,Grenada and Dominican Republic invasions were very one-sided ).
They cling to this use of weaponry to implement policy, instead of trying to negotiate solutions.
None more so than the simplistic President Trump.
His go-to solution for gun deaths is more guns.
Arming eight teachers isn’t even an attempt at a viable solution.
American schools are much better equipped than ours with much bigger campuses. By the time one of these armed teachers had responded and located an attacker, there could be scores dead.
These guardians would presumably be wielding handguns against semi-automatics, which doesn’t inspire confidence. In the worst scenario, there are about 100,000 public schools in the USA, meaning that there’d be nearly a million armed teachers. It is not beyond the realms of possibility that one of them could “lose” it and make a mockery of this approach.
If Hollywood has taught us anything, it is that if you disarm the gunmen, less people die.

23/2/18        TV Licence
The reason given for an increase in the TV licence is that people are switching to streaming services.
These users are likely to be the upcoming generations, so it is also likely that BBC funding will continue to fall, as my generation dies off and the licence charge rises further.
The Government needs to consider direct funding, if politicians wish to keep close control of its News broadcasting.
As a side thought, it’d be interesting to see austerity applied to BBC salaries.

24/2/18     rich on means testing
Brian Reade calls for better-off pensioners to forego free prescriptions.
Apart from endorsing Austerity measures, it’s likely to see off OAP’s who just fail the cut-off line, as in Trumps USA.
I have never liked means-testing, re-calling how nastily it was applied in my Mum’s recollections of her early days.
However; there is a form of means testing, which won’t harm anyone.
Put extra taxes on Restaurants.
This would only affect those with so much extra cash that they can afford to pay for the over-priced, poorly-cooked food , of which he complains

24/2/18   TV  pap

I was interested in Fiona’s piece on the seventies, in regards to TV programmes.
I frequently watch Talking TV pictures, as an escape from the pap shown on the rest of the Freeview channels.
As a Baby Boomer I’m not as easily offended by such things as actors blacking up but I was a little surprised, however, to notice a quick cameo of Al Jolson in Cliff Richards film “A Wonderful life”.
I then mused on the First Talking Picture, where “Jolson Speaks/Sings”.
Undoubtedly racist but there was no intentional racism.
Back then it was akin to boys taking girls parts on the stage of the Globe theatre.

26/2/18   obesity epidemic
The warnings of an obesity epidemic centre on trying to get us to change our lifestyles, by for instance turning Vegan.
Yet we have the announcement of a new veggie burger from the USA.
It’ll still have a bun and lashings of dressing but it won’t stop you getting fat.
Obesity will continue to be a problem as stress creates a Nation of people turning to food for comfort.
Dr. Miriam Stoppard points out the dangers of fat cells in our body.
They produce chemicals such as Oestrogen, growth hormone, Insulin and others which affect how the body works.
The general medical advice is eat less and exercise more.
The problem is that by the time this advice is given, people are too fat and possibly too old to exercise effectively.
There are other hormones, that fat cells produce, not mentioned by Dr. Stoppard, which make us hungrier, if we try to eat less.
We have a catch 22 situation:
We need to exercise and eat less, to avoid diabetes, cancer, strokes , heart attacks i.e. dying, or we need to cut away the fat with tummy tucks and/or liposuction, as described by Lisa Riley.
The catch is which comes first.
Our body works against us, if we try to change our lifestyle and we get yo-yo dieting with even more stress on the body.
If we go for the surgery first, it’s expensive and offends our puritan ethic. It also rewards the feckless, who may ignore the need for life-style changes and find the fat piling on elsewhere on the body.
As politicians will never address reducing the need for comfort food, or those, such as McDonalds, who provide it, politicians and the BMA might consider investing in liposuction for the masses; or equipping crematoria to cope with larger coffins.