@BBCBreakfast thanks for giving that nice banker man airtime to tell us that contactless credit cards are safe.

@BBCBreakfast thanks for giving that nicebanker man airtime to tellus that contactless credit cards are safe.
A few minutes Googling will tell you that the banker man is dancing around the real risks.
The devices in shops, which read your card (they don’t read mine because I keep them in an Aluminium wallet (£6 on the internet or £11 via the Daily Express)) have to be set to a 1 metre/£20 limit.
They can actually be set to a 5 metre/unlimited funds limit.
In practice the card issuers could and probably would block large, or unusual, withdrawals.
The 5 metre limit has been demonstrated on at least one American TV program, although I can no longer find a link to that particular video I’m sure it still exists, somewhere.
This video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elBWoMXt3WY ) shows how a cheap, close proximity device can be used to rapidly clone your card and make small purchases but I’m sure there are innovative thieves out there, who could devise new ways of using them to get rich.
e.g. Suppose I could pose as a legitimate trader wanting to use a reader. I set up in a busy high street, possibly with a market stall. I’m selling cheap £5 watches etc. every card passing could be my customer, for a period of 3 weeks, or so. Depending on what level of turnover would get the banks suspicious, I could ring up a useful income and spend the rest of each year in The Bahama’s.

But it’s not just credit cards as this video on Oyster cards points out.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0I3KvUfKIw
Particularly worrying for Ed Miliband, perhaps, who’s just announced a wish to roll out Oyster cards, nationally.
Not mentioned is that Rfid’s are used in your passports and apart from cloning passports, how handy for terrorists wanting to discover which traveller’s belong to which countries, without having to search for their passports. (reader’s at passport control were originally set to 5 metres but reduced to 1 metre to pretend that the risk had also been reduced)
I’m glad that someone pointed out his folly to a particular Eurocrat, who wanted to insert them in high value Euro notes (they’re so small, I’ve read M&S put them in garments they sell to track shopper’s). Imagine a courier, or a rich tourist wearing a money belt, getting into the wrong taxi.
RFID’s are useful (pets are given them) but it is wrong that Banks etc. force us to rely on them, just to maximise their profits, at our risk.
The real danger comes when The Government forces ID cards on us and we find Armed police breaking down our doors to cart us of to a Romanian Jail (European arrest warrant), because of flaws in this technology and the systems supporting them.

Advertisements

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: